Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements Bangkok, Thailand.

Day 2 :

  • Keynote Speech

Session Introduction

Chandan Prasad

Texas Woman’s University, USA

Title: Pharmacobiology of cyclic dipeptides: Neuroceuticals to nutraceuticals

Time : 09:30-10:05

Speaker
Biography:

Chandan Prasad has completed his PhD in Microbiology/Biochemistry at Louisiana State University in 1970. He has served LSU Health Sciences Center as Professor (Medicine and Neuroscience), Director of Obesity Research Program and Vice Chairman in the Department of Medicine. He has joined Texas Woman’s University as Professor and Chair of the Department of Nutrition and served till 2012. He has also served TWU as Assistant Provost for Research Promotion. Currently, he is a Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences at the Texas Woman's University and Professor (Emeritus) of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA. The current focus of his research is on inflammation and the role of dietary supplements in obesity, diabetes and heart diseases. He has authored more than 200 papers in the area off appetite regulation, obesity, and nutrition. He holds four US and international patents for treatment of obesity and alcoholism. He is the Founding Editor of Nutritional Neuroscience, Series Editor for Nutrition, Brain and Behavior, Editor-in-Chief of Current Topics in Nutraceutical Research and Member of the Board of the International Society of Nutrigenetics/Nutrigenomics.

Abstract:

Cyclic dipeptides consist of a broad array of natural as well as products resulting from food processing that exhibit useful biological properties. Diketopiperazines are the smallest cyclic peptides that have been shown to exist in bacteria, fungi and higher organisms as well as processed food. These diketopiperazines have been shown to exhibit a variety of biological/pharmacologic activities including, antitumor, antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial, antiprion, antihyperglycemic, antineurotoxic and many others. The answer to the diversity of the biological/pharmacologic activities associated with these diketopiperazines perhaps lies in their structural differences and specificity in the mechanism of action. In this presentation, using cyclo (His-Pro) as an example, I will present a historical overview of this rapidly expanding field that will focus on mechanism of action when possible. Lastly, there will be a brief comment on the possible use of some of these diketopiperazines as nutraceuticals/pharmaceuticals.

Speaker
Biography:

Jiankang Liu has received his BS from Xi’an Jiaotong Unviersity in 1982 and PhD of Medical Science from Okayama University School of Medicine in 1994. He has completed Post doctorate training in Dr. Bruce Ames Laboratory at University of California, Berkeley and worked as a Faculty at University of California at Berkeley, Children Hospital Oakland Research Institute, University of California at Irvine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine and Shanghai Institute for Nutritional Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Currently, he is a Professor and the Dean of Xi’an Jiaotong University School of Life Science and Technology and an Adjunct Professor of the School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California. His research interests include molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging, stress and age-/stress associated degenerative diseases with a focus on nutritional regulation of mitochondrial metabolism. He has published more 150 papers in international journals with more than 4000 times citations (H-index 37) and was elected as one of the “2014 Most Cited Chinese Researchers” in the area of Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology by Elsevier

Abstract:

Due to the limitation and ineffectiveness of antioxidants in extending life span and preventing age-related diseases, scientists have being tried to find new solutions beyond antioxidants for delaying aging and preventing age-related diseases. The French paradox-derived resveratrol has become a star of nutraceutical because of the discovery of its effect on Sirtuins regulation by Sinclare’s lab at Harvard on. Nowadays, resveratrol has been widely studied on retarding aging and preventing/ameliorating numerous disorders in cellular and animal models as well as clinical studies. We have recently investigated a number of naturally occurring nutraceuticals and found that hydroxytyrosol (HT) has a unique and potent effect on regulating mitochondrial metabolism (biogenesis and degradation). HT is abundant in olives and virgin olive oil, which are widely used in Mediterranean diets. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that the people of the Mediterranean basin enjoy a healthy lifestyle with decreased incidence of heart disease, prostate and colon cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. One of the possible reasons is that Mediterranean people have a high intake of HT from olive and olive oil. The beneficial effects of HT have been mainly attributed to its antioxidant effect. However, we have demonstrated that HT is an effective mitochondria-targeting nutraceutical in various cellular and animal models, including age-associated macular degeneration, metabolic disorders, cancer, osteoporosis and muscle atrophy. Because mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in aging and various diseases the potent effects of HT on regulating mitochondrial metabolism suggest that HT is a rising star of nutraceutical after resveratrol and will be widely used for delaying aging and preventing/ameliorating age-associated diseases

  • Vitamin Supplements
    Functional Foods
    Nutraceutical and Functional Food Products

Session Introduction

Rakesh K Trivedi

professor & Director STEP-HBTI (Harcourt Butler Technological Institute), India

Title: Lipid based Nutraceuticals: availability and acceptance

Time : 11:00-11:25

Speaker
Biography:

Prof (Dr) Rakesh K. Trivedi, M.Tech. & Ph.D., is currently Professor at HBTI,Kanpur & Director STEP-HBTI as well. He is a Teaching Faculty in the Department of Oil & Paint Technology at HBTI, Kanpur for 31 Years. He specializes in the area of lipids has published more than 65 research papers in national and international journals, supervised three doctoral theses and edited Five books. He has worked on Two visiting assignments at University of Guelph, Canada and Purdue University, USA, chaired several international seminars. He is the present Vice-President of Oil Technologist Association of India (HQ).He has worked as consultant to MI, WHO, CPCB, MARKFED, HAFED.

Abstract:

Nutraceutical based on lipids are derived mainly from oil seeds. Several fatty acids,which are derived from fatty oils are and part of food products , are dietary supplements. These lipid based fatty acids can promote our health or provide protection against some diseases. Based on several studies it has been found that long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) and some fatty acids with conjugated double bonds would fall in this category. Polyunsaturated fatty acids contain two or more double bonds and have long been recognized as essential nutrients for mammals. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been found in the cells of mammalian retina and brain tissues, are essential for their growth and normal function of human eye and brain. PUFA have been recognized as beneficial for patients who suffer from few diseases. Conjugated fatty acids are newly recognized nutraceutical compounds, within which, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is presently the most popular. Dietary supplements of this fatty acid was shown to inhibit chemical induced skin and stomach cancers, reduce development to atherosclerosis and enhance immune function in mammals. There are hundreds of different lipid based compounds identified in nature, of which many have potentials for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical uses. The details presentation will be given along with availability of these componds.

Speaker
Biography:

Thanutchaporn Kumrungsee has completed her BS in Food Science and Technology from Kasetsart University, Thailand, MS and PhD in Food Analysis and Postdoctoral studies from Kyushu University Japan. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor in Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition at Graduate School of Bioshere Science, Hiroshima University, Japan. Her research interests are in elucidation of food factors with potent preventive effects on lifestyle-related diseases and their mechanisms by application of metabolomics analyses. Her inspirational research quote is “Let food be your medicine”.

Abstract:

Yeast extract has been used commercially in a food industry as a food additive. In spite of rich in nutrition, an application as nutraceuticals and functional foods along with its physiological effects is not wildly studied. Since it was reported that compounds containing a purine moiety e.g., adenine and adenosine and an imidazole moiety e.g., bioactive Trp-His peptide, exerted vascular protective effects such as vasorelaxant, anti-hypertensive and atherosclerotic effects. Thus, it was speculated that yeast extract rich in nucleotides might mediate vasoprotective effects and contain the potent candidates’ compounds. The objectives of this study were to examine the vasorelaxant effect of yeast extract (Candida utilis); identify candidates responsible for the effect by using chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses; and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. This study provided the first evidence that C. utilis yeast extract exerted vasorelaxation in 1 μM phenylephrine (PE)-contracted Sprague-Dawley rat aortic rings. 5'-Methylthioadenosine (MTA) was identified as a new naturally-occurring vasodilator, exerting comparable power with a well-known vasodilator adenosine. MTA exerted vasorelaxation independent of endothelial layer and adenosine receptors. MTA reduced a CaCl2-induced vasocontraction stimulated by 1 μM PE, whereas the effect was abolished in a 60 mM KCl-induced vasocontraction. MTA significantly (P<0.01) attenuated the PE-stimulated calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMK II) in the aortic rings and inhibited the phosphorylation of L-type Ca2+ channel (VDCC). In conclusion, the underlying mechanisms of MTA-induced vasorelaxation involve the suppression of extracellular Ca2+ influx partly through retardation of the CaMK II-VDCC phosphorylation pathway.

Speaker
Biography:

Jatin R Joshi has completed his Medical training from University College London, graduating with honors. He did his Surgical Residency in London with specialization in Plastic and Reconstructive surgery gaining Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons. He is the Founder and President of Instavit Ltd, a nutraceutical company that utilizes oral spray technology as the delivery vehicle for nutritional supplementation. He has published several papers, authored surgical textbooks and presented internationally.

Abstract:

The need for nutritional supplementation is a contentious issue. It is one that has divided both the scientific community and public opinion. With my background as a surgeon I started as a cynic, I would see undigested tablets in the colons of patients and ingredient lists full of indigestible fillers. My opinion was that in a society where a healthy and well-balanced diet was accessible to most, there was no need to consider vitamin supplementation. All this changed after I was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease in my early twenties. I was a trainee surgeon working over 110 hours a week whilst my condition progressively deteriorated. Following major emergency abdominal surgery, I was left with severe nutritional deficiencies; the need to take vitamin supplements became essential to my well being, but as with most individuals, my compliance rates were appalling. I had to find another way. The journey for me from a surgeon to an innovator was driven out of a genuine necessity, not only to find a way to increase my compliance but also to help others struggling to achieve a balanced diet or those having difficulty with digestive absorption issues. Approaching the problems from a functional and delivery standpoint, I was able to develop a line of supplements that use oral spray technology to improve compliance and dosage control by way of its delivery system, accessibility and ease of use. It was the answer for me but as I discovered it became the answer for thousands of others.

Speaker
Biography:

Seung-Kwon Myung has received his MD from Seoul National University College of Medicine and has completed his PhD in Family Medicine from the same university. He is an Associate Professor of Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Korea. He has published 63 papers in reputed medical journals and served as an Editor-In-Chief of the Korean Journal of Family Medicine. His research specialty is meta-analysis and his research areas are cancer prevention and food, specifically the efficacy of vitamin supplements and functional foods on health.

Abstract:

This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the efficacy of vitamin and antioxidant supplements in the prevention of bladder cancer as reported by randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library in April 2015. Two of the authors independently reviewed and selected eligible RCTs, based on pre-determined selection criteria. Out of 180 articles searched from three databases and relevant bibliographies, 14 RCTs were included in the final analysis. In a fixed effect meta-analysis, there was no efficacy of vitamin and antioxidant supplements in the prevention of bladder cancer (relative risk (RR), 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-1.16; I2=43.4%). Overall, there was no preventive effect of these supplements in the subgroup meta-analyses by various factors. Among the subgroup analyses by type of supplements, beta-carotene supplementation alone was marginally increased the risk of bladder cancer (RR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.00-2.09; I2=0.0%; n=3). The current meta-analysis of RCTs found that there was no clinical evidence to support the efficacy of vitamin and antioxidant supplements in the prevention of bladder cancer.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Kiran Thakur has completed Ph.D in Dairy Microbiology at National Dairy Research Institute (NDRI), Karnal, and Haryana, India. She is the member of Singapore Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology (SSMB) and International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP). She has been conferred BEST THESIS AWARD 2013-2014 for outstanding Doctoral Research work and Director’s Gold Medal for the same. Her PhD work has been recognized at various national and international platforms. She has attended Annual meeting organized by (ISAPP) at Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA (May 18- 21, 2015) and International Seminar on Pharmaceutical Science and Technology at Padjadjaran University at Indonesia. She has been granted “Outstanding Oral Presenter” at 7th Asian Conference at Lactic Acid Bacteria held on 6- 8 September, 2013 at Indian habitat centre, New Delhi and also bagged Best Poster Presentation Award at National level. She has Presented Poste for Rowett-INRA 2014 Conference (co-hosted by ISAPP) “Gut Microbiology: from sequence to function”, at Aberdeen, Scotland, UK on 16-19 June, 2014. She has attended workshop at National University of Singapore Sep, 2013. She has published 9 Research and Review articles with high impact international and national journals. She has published 12 popular articles. She has submitted 15 partial 16s DNA sequences in NCBI. She is the authors of many articles in newspapers and magazines. She has also contributed for technical manuals and compendium at national levels. She has authored two books for Lambert Academic Publishing, Germany. She is continuously seeking a dynamic & challenging career in Academics as well as Research and development in Food science and Technology and to promote the new research scenario as an ideal human resource.

Abstract:

Riboflavin is an obligatory component of cellular metabolism, being as ultimate precursor of coenzyme FMN and FAD which are obtained by the phosphorylation of riboflavin in all living cells. It has been traditionally synthesized for food and feed fortification by chemicals means but past decade has witnessed a surge in information about commercial biotechnological processes. Hence this project was aimed at the isolation, identification and riboflavin operon characterization of lactobacilli from various niches. Among the 55 isolates bioprospected from dairy and non dairy sources, 16 isolates were found harboring complete Rib structural genes. The cloning and sequencing of rib genes from one isolates was done for BLAST analysis. The isolates harboring both complete as well as incomplete operon were compared phenotypically for riboflavin production by chemical, fluorescence and microbiological based assays and the microbiological assay method was found most sensitive among these three methods. Among the 30 isolates tested for riboflavin production ability, 10 were found to be riboflavin producers. Among them, isolates viz., KTLF1, KTLF9, KTLP1, KTLF11, and KTLF16 have shown 1.89 mg/L, 1.5 mg/L, 1.456 mg/L, 1.19 mg/L and 1.67 mg/L respectively. The isolate KTLF12, LP13 and KTLF2 have shown 0.95 mg/L, 0.83 mg/L and 0.46 mg/L of riboflavin production. (These isolates were able to survive in medium devoid of riboflavin as well as they have supported the growth of riboflavin auxotroph (L. casei MTCC1408). Among the screened isolates on agar diffusion assay, the maximum increase in growth of auxotroph was observed in the presence of KTLF1 and KTLF16 respectively. Expression pattern of rib genes was studied in selected isolates viz., LF1, LF2, LF3, LF4, LP1 and MTCC8711. RNA was isolated at different intervals of time in MRS and Riboflavin assay medium (RAM), milk and whey based medium. The range of relative fold in mRNA expression in Rib1 gene is 5 to 55 fold, 0.5 to 35 fold in Rib2 gene, 0.2 to 6.5 fold in Rib3 and 0.2 to 26 fold in Rib4 in MRS and RAM over control culture. On the basis of fold increase in relative mRNA expression of all the Rib genes, the isolate KTLF1 was selected for expression studies in milk and whey. The fold increase observed was 0 to 1.1 fold in Rib1, 0 to 2 fold in Rib2, 0 to 2 fold in Rib 3 and 0 to 0.9 fold increases in mRNA expression in milk and whey. The riboflavin producers were further screened for in vitro probiotic, safety aspects as well as technological properties. Three riboflavin producing isolates KTLF2, KTLF5 and KTMUC were able to show potential probiotic and safety attributes, while KTLF5 was showing appreciable adhesion on HT-29 cell lines as well as hold the promises to be used as novel starter cultures. The expression profile has given the clear picture of variation in expression profile of rib genes at different intervals of time. All of the four genes have displayed significant difference with respect to media and time intervals. The isolate KTLF1, KTLP1 from human feces, KTLF16 from fermented bamboo shoot has shown highest riboflavin production. The study has generated the data for further exploration of these isolates endowed with appreciable starter as well as functional activities for industrial use as novel and native starter cultures to produce an essential vitamin in situ which would contribute significantly to the functional value of certain fermented foods.

Speaker
Biography:

Prachya Kongtawelert has completed his PhD from Sydney University since 1992. He is currently working as Associate Professor in Department of Biochemistry. He is interested in researches concerning about pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, including diagnosis and treatment. Further, he has developed the formulation for dietary supplement products based on the active ingredient of sesamin, which is a natural compound from sesame.

Abstract:

Sesame has been used as food over 4,000 years. It contains very high value of nutritional compounds. One of them is sesamin, which is the most containing of lignan in sesame. There are many research papers concerning about its pharmacological activities. This leading to the research, and development, and apply this natural compound, sesamin, for widely uses as functional foods and cosmetics. It has been studied in our laboratorie as anti-cartilage degradation (as anti-osteoarthritis and anti-rheumatoid arthrisits) by inhibition of the Inteleukin-1 Beta, which is the most potent pro-inflammatoray cytokine, throgh NFkB and NAPK sinalling pathway in human chondrocyte culture. Sesamin shows the chodroprotective effects in cartilage explant culture and papain induced cartilage degradation in rat model. We are also studied anti-osteoporosis as enhancing the mineralisation, and stimulating osteoblast functions by up-regulating Type-II Collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). The osteoclastogenesis was inhibited by sesamin. Furthermore, the neuro-protective effect on the LPS-induced neuronal cell (PC12) development has been studied. Finally, the pathway of commercialization for development of simple and innovative dietary supplement of healthy products from sesamin with other natural resources, such as black rice bran and pre-cooked rice have been succesfully formulated and sold in several countries, especially in Southeast Asian.

Pritee Paliwal

Synthite Industries Ltd, India

Title: Technology Next-Generation Nutraceutical world

Time : 13:55-14:20

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Pritee Paliwal has as over 15 years experience in Neutraceutical and Personal care Industry. She acquired a US Patent (US 2011/0033565) of Cosmo-Technology. She is also the Co-Author for LLC Nutriscience Publication, Tetrahydrocurcuminoids (C3 Reduct –Cascade Transformation. Globally she presented technical seminar and launched products- UK, Germany, Switzerland, Brazil, Barcelona, Bangkok, Taiwan, South Korea, China, India. She is the Heading Nutraceutical team of Synthite® Industries Ltd., is the world’s largest manufacturer and exporter of Spice Oleoresin and essential oils..She also won young scientist award and has authored 15 international publications and 12 articles in magzines world wide.

Abstract:

The current study aims to identify safe technology for nutraceutical ingredients. Supercritical fluids are highly compressed gases, which have combined properties of gases and liquids in an intriguing manner. Supercritical fluids can lead to reactions, which are difficult or even impossible to achieve in conventional solvents. It is a fast process completed in 10 to 60 minutes. A supercritical fluid can be separated from analyte by simply releasing pressure, leaving almost no trace and yields a pure residue. Straights place the goodness of minimally processed artisan ingredients in the hands of the Formulator and Food Manufacturer. When you create your next line of seasonings, soups, chorizos, pepperonis, sauces salads, bakes, goulashes, curries, salsa’s and stews, our straight extracts will add that perfect natural flavor and color making your products the choice of the consumer. Nutraceuticals are products that provide health and medicinal benefits, including the prevention and treatment of disease in addition to the basic nutritional value found in foodstuff. Nutraceuticals are particularly of interest to the present generation because they have the potential to substantially reduce the expensive, high tech, disease treatment approaches presently being employed in western healthcare. Primarily used in functional foods and dietary supplements, nutraceuticals ingredients are natural bioactive, chemical compounds that have health promoting disease preventive or medical properties. Since the early 1990s, there has been a considerable shift in consumers (Especially consumers from developed countries) perspective towards nutraceuticals and functional foods. Currently, consumers are much more conscious and aware about health and many share the perception that the onset of many chronic diseases can be prevented with the proper intake of nutritious diet. Food supplements are not only being consumed for just meeting the recommended dietary allowances but also as a mechanism for performance enhancement and disease prevention. An accelerated world demands an accelerated lifestyle. This in turn has placed huge demands on our health, which is reflected in our food habits. While we may have no control over our lives, we can control our dietary behavior. This is where science and technology meets food and nutrition. The increased public awareness of the health, environment and safety concerns associated with the use of some organic solvents in food processing and the possible solvent contamination of the final products. The high cost of organic solvents and the increasingly stringent environmental regulations together with the new requirements of the medical and food industries for ultra-pure and high added value products have pointed out the need for the development of new and clean technologies for the processing of food ingredients. Supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE) process has emerged as the alternative to the traditional solvent extraction process. It is a separation technique, which is developed by use of the fluid that has the ability of dissolution at supercritical pressure and supercritical temperature. Synthite® has a state-of-the-art manufacturing plant for new technology (Super Critical Fluid Extraction (CO2) and Straight (Straights are a class of 100% natural non-selective, mechanically processed ingredients), which ensures green, environment-friendly isolates of the botanical, by eliminating solvent residue and high temperature processing. Green technology is the answer to the growing demand for pure and natural substances in the industry and the Straights are our answer to this multidimensional challenge that formulators and manufacturers face

Speaker
Biography:

Siew Young Quek was graduated with a PhD degree from School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham (UK) in 1999. She is the Director of Food Science Program at University of Auckland. Her current research interests include microencapsulation of bioactives for delivery into functional foods, extraction & characterization of bioactives/functional ingredients from food and waste byproducts, processing & food quality and food product development. She has published more than 200 journals articles and conference proceedings, 4 book chapters and delivered 21 reports for industries. She is a Fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Food Science and Technology.

Abstract:

The increasing pressure on the food industry to produce healthy food products has, as a result, unveiled the challenge of processing functional ingredients in a way that meets the requirements of the modern day consumer. The major issues limiting the use of functional ingredients without prior processing include vulnerability to oxidative breakdown, limited water or lipid solubility, poor thermal stability and poor taste. Unprocessed, these ingredients such as bioactive compounds are essentially unsuitable for use as food ingredients due to any of the aforementioned reasons. This leads to the application of microencapsulation technology as one of the methods in production of food ingredients for functional food application. By utilizing microencapsulation technology, it is possible to produce functional ingredients with desirable chemical and physical properties. This paper aims to provide an understanding on the application of microencapsulation processes to produce functional ingredients for foods. Microencapsulation of lipophilic bioactive components (LBCs) and the development in the area will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Toshikazu Suzuki has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University and postdoctoral studies from National Institute of Infectious Disease, Japan. He is the Associate Professor of Department of Health and Nutrition, Wayo Women’s University. He has published more than 60 papers in Journals and has been serving as a councilor of The Japanese Clinical Nutrition Association.

Abstract:

A non-essential nutrient, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a key element in mitochondrial energy production and antioxidant protection. Daily intake of CoQ10 is not considered in nutritional guidance or menu planning. Hospitalized older people have lower blood levels of CoQ10 with possible decreased intake of CoQ10 compared with healthy older people, suggesting that adequate intake of CoQ10 maintains wellness in older people. First we estimated daily intake of CoQ10 from food, designed a food intake guide for ingestion of increased amounts of CoQ10 with balanced food choice and evaluated the usability in a diet intervention trial. Average daily intake of CoQ10 from food was 1.9 mg/1000 kcal/day in both men and women. Ratio of dietary animal to vegetable protein was involved in the amount of CoQ10 intake. Our food intervention was effective in increasing CoQ10 intake at up to 1mg/day while maintaining PFC balance. However, choice of food items was sometimes a burden to the participants. Next, we investigated the effect of food choice and efficacy of CoQ10-fortified food on blood CoQ10 levels. Two weeks prohibition of meat/poultry consumption decreased blood CoQ10 levels by ~0.1µg/mL. Eating 300 g/day of CoQ10-fortified boiled rice (13 mg CoQ10/100g rice) could increase both intake and blood levels of CoQ10. Our results indicate that the choice of a CoQ10-fortified food may be more applicative for keeping/raising blood CoQ10 levels than food intervention. Further study of the effect of CoQ10-fortified food intake on maintaining/improving the quality of life of the older people should be pursued

Biography:

Muhammad Umair Arshad is from University of Toronto, Canada

Abstract:

Dietary polysaccharides may contribute to metabolic and physiological regulations, including satiety and glycemia, because of their properties of adding bulk and producing viscosity. In the present study we compared the postprandial glycemic and satiety responses of different dietary polysaccharides when added in milk (2% M.F.). The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of different polysaccharides against postprandial glucose, appetite responses and food intake at subsequent meal. In a repeated measures crossover trial, 30 female participants (18-30 years) randomly consumed 250 ml milk 2% M.F. (control), or milk containing carrageenan (2.5 g), guar gum (2.5 g) and alginate (2.5 g). An ad libitum pizza meal was served to measure the food intake at 120 min following the treatments. Alginate and guar gum addition resulted in lower food intake as well as cumulative energy intake at subsequent pizza meal compared with control treatment. The post-treatment (0-120 min) as well as cumulative (0-170 min) postprandial glucose levels and average appetite scores were also significantly suppressed following alginate and guar gum compared with control (P<0.0001) with more pronounced effect of guar gum during post-treatment time (0-120 min). However, alginate resulted in significantly lower blood glucose mean values (P<0.0001) compared with control as well as carrageenan during post-treatment (0-120 min) and cumulative periods (0-170 min). In Conclusion, addition of polysaccharides in milk particularly, alginate and guar gum would be beneficial in the short term regulation of postprandial glycemia and satiety, respectively.

Speaker
Biography:

Natanamurugaraj Govindan has completed his PhD from Bharathidasan University, India and Postdoctoral studies from Massey University, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, New Zealand. He has published more than 35 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of International Journal of Chemical and Life Sciences, International Journal of Medicine and Biosciences, Journal of Research and Application and International Journal of Diabetes & Clinical Research. The current research areas of Nutraceutical treatment for colon cancer and anticancer activity from microalgae.

Abstract:

Commelina nudiflora L. aqueous extract as a reducing and stabilizing agent for the synthesis of metallic gold and silver nanoparticles in green chemistry approaches. The biosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles have studied their physicochemical and biological properties in nanoscale regime. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles physicochemical properties were characterized by various analytical techniques such as UV-VIS, FESEM, XRD and FT-IR. The outcome shows that the physicochemical characterizations of gold and silver nanoparticles were crystalline in nature with size range between 25-45 nm and 50-150 nm respectively. The EDX spectrum was shown strong signal energy peaks of both gold and silver atoms in 2-3 keV. The in vitro antioxidant ability of C. nudiflora extracts were studied using DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assay. Moreover the C. nudiflora plant extract synthesized gold and silver metal nanoparticles have significantly control the proliferation of HCT-116 colon cancer cells in in vitro. The biosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles were showed reduced cell viability and increased cytotoxicity on HCT-116 colon cancer cells with IC50 concentration of 200 and 100 µg/ml. Furthermore, the flow cytometry experiments showed that the IC50 concentrations of gold and silver nanoparticles treated cells are increased DNA fragmentation and significant changes were observed in sub G1, S and G2 cell cycle phases compared with positive control. Additionally, the mRNA gene expressions of HCT-116 cells were studied by RT-qPCR techniques. The pro-apoptotic genes are highly expressed in the gold nanoparticles treated HCT-116 colon cancer model. However, the C. nudiflora extract as a novel source for synthesis of metallic gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled size and shapes and also it could be potent anti-colon cancer drug in the near future.